July 22, 2014
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July 16, 2014

For centuries people have found meaning — or thought they did — in what they could see in the sky, the shapes of the constellations echoing old myths, the sudden feathery intrusion of comets, the regular dances of the planets, the chains of galaxies, spanning unfathomable distances of time and space. Since the 1980s, however, astronomers have been forced to confront the possibility that most of the universe is invisible, and that all the glittering chains of galaxies are no more substantial, no more reliable guides to physical reality, than greasepaint on the face of a clown. (via Stalking the Shadow Universe - NYTimes.com)

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July 7, 2014
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Flying through a firework show with a DJI Phantom 2 and filming it with a GoPro Hero 3 silver.

(Source: youtube.com)

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July 6, 2014

Bestselling Books that nobody finishes.

  • Amazon's "Popular Highlights" feature provides one quick and dirty measure. Every book's Kindle page lists the five passages most highlighted by readers. If every reader is getting to the end, those highlights could be scattered throughout the length of the book. If nobody has made it past the introduction, the popular highlights will be clustered at the beginning.
  • Thus, the Hawking Index (HI): Take the page numbers of a book's five top highlights, average them, and divide by the number of pages in the whole book. The higher the number, the more of the book we're guessing most people are likely to have read.
  • Bestsellers Lean In, by tech executive Sheryl Sandberg; Thinking Fast and Slow, by Nobel Prize–winning economist and psychologist Daniel Kahneman; and Hawking's Brief History of Time all fared poorly, scoring 12.3%, 6.8%, and 6.6%, respectively. But the most unread book of all, by a wide margin, was French economist Thomas Picketty's bestselling Capital in the Twenty-First Century, which came in at 2.4%.
  • http: //online.wsj.com/articles/the-summers-most-unread-book-is-1404417569
  • "The Goldfinch" by Donna Tartt : 98.5%
  • "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins : 43.4%
  • "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald : 28.3%
  • "Fifty Shades of Grey" by E.L. James: 25.9%
  • "Flash Boys" by Michael Lewis : 21.7%
  • "Lean In" by Sheryl Sandberg : 12.3%
  • "Thinking Fast and Slow" by Daniel Kahneman : 6.8%
  • "A Brief History of Time" by Stephen Hawking: 6.6%
  • "Capital in the Twenty-First Century" by Thomas Piketty : 2.4%
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June 18, 2014
(via Dilbert comic strip for 07/03/2011 from the official Dilbert comic strips archive.)
If you find yourself doing this, realize there is a Dilbert comic about you. :)

(via Dilbert comic strip for 07/03/2011 from the official Dilbert comic strips archive.)
If you find yourself doing this, realize there is a Dilbert comic about you. :)

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June 10, 2014
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June 5, 2014
Under current practices, both expenditures and revenues rise to meet each other, no matter which one may be in excess.
Bolton’s Law of Ascending Budgets
The Complete Edition of Murphy’s Laws
I love these things…
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June 2, 2014
As I’ve noted before, when we were growing up “later” meant that you could paint the same landscape, see the same animals, climb the same trees, fish the same rivers, visit the same Antarctica, enjoy the same weather or rescue the same endangered species that you did when you were a kid — but just later, whenever you got around to it. Not anymore. Later is now when you won’t be able to do any of them ever again. So whatever you’re planning to save, please save it now. Because later is when they’ll be gone. Later will be too late. Later — like private, local and average — is over.
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May 9, 2014
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May 8, 2014
Our economies hadn’t been shaped by our sense of fairness; it was the other way around.
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May 2, 2014
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The only reason coders’ computers work better than non-coders’ computers is coders know computers are schizophrenic little children with auto-immune diseases and we don’t beat them when they’re bad.

Programming Sucks

This essay is probably the best thing I’ve read in a long time.

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